American Flowers Week featured in Florists’ Review’s June issue

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In Year Three, American Flowers Week Salutes Iconic U.S.-Grown Flowers and Foliages with a Couture Approach

We’re so excited to share the story of American Flowers Week 2017 in the new issue of Florists’ Review! Here’s a sneak peek of the spreads in Debra Prinzing’s story, titled “Homegrown Event presents Floral Fashions.”

The opening paragraphs tell how American Flowers Week came to be:

In 2015, while in London for the Chelsea Flower Show, I met with Helen Evans, one of the geniuses behind New Covent Garden Market’s successful British Flowers Week campaign (June 19-25, 2017). The U.K.’s most important wholesale floral hub launched BFW in 2013 as a low-budget, social media-driven “annual celebration of seasonal, locally-grown flowers and foliage united the U.K. cut flower industry and sparking public and media interest in where our flowers come from.” It has become a popular and successful campaign to promote British flowers — and floral designers.

By the time we had finished sipping from our steaming mugs of tea in the Market’s employee break room, I was thinking to myself: “I should start American Flowers Week.”

Helen and her colleagues were immensely helpful and supportive. I returned to the U.S. in late May 2015 inspired by the BFW model, equipped with Helen’s suggestions and resources, and by the end of June, I introduced American Flowers Week.

It seemed entirely fitting that our week coincides with Independence Day, July 4th. Not only do these dates provide a patriotic hook on which to hang AFW, the timing is perfect because there are local flowers growing on farms in all 50 U.S. states, Alaska included, in late June and early July. And, as one wholesale floral manager suggested: “It’s otherwise a down time in floral, so we love having a new event to help promote flowers.”

The initial grass-roots endeavor enjoyed 400,000 social media impressions during the 2015 campaign. In 2016, we added beautiful collateral material, a free USA floral coloring map that participating florists and flower farmers could download and share with customers, and even red-white-and-blue stickers used by florists, flower farmers and retailers to label their AFW bouquets. Impressions on social media hit 1.3 million last year.

For 2017, I’ve borrowed yet another page from British Flowers Week. BFW selects five iconic U.K.-grown flowers and pairs each with a high-profile florist or design team to produce installations and vignettes. The press and online media devour these images — and of course, the publication of them creates a buzz about British flowers and the farmers and florists who supply them.

Slow Flowers, which presents AFW, has commissioned several floral-inspired fashion shoots depicting iconic American grown blooms. The designers who contributed their creativity and artistic talents teamed up with generous flower farms that donated stems straight from their fields and greenhouses.

The goal? To showcase domestic and seasonal flowers in a new and engaging way — and to show how inventiveness and ingenuity, along with American grown flowers, produce beautiful results.

These All-American floral looks would never have been possible without the support of Slow Flowers’ sponsors, including Certified American Grown, Arctic Alaska Peony Cooperative, Longfield Gardens, Syndicate Sales, Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, Johnny’s Selected Seeds and Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers.

Congrats to all of our talented designers, photographers, models, hair/makeup artists — AND ESPECIALLY, the Flower Farmers who provided the blooms. See credits below.

To subscribe to Florists’ Review, click here.

Floral Palette: Sunflower, Rudbeckia, Amaranth and ornamental grasses
Designer: Amy Kunkel-Patterson, Gather Design Co. (Seattle, WA)
Floral ingredients supplied by Seattle Wholesale Growers Market.

Model: Kelly Uhlig, Sonshine Farm, Langley, WA
Hair/Makeup: Yessie Libby, Yessie Makeup Artistry, Seattle
Photography: Anna Peters, Anna Peters Photography, Seattle
Location: Everyday Flowers, Stanwood, WA

Floral Palette: A medley of flowers and foliage from the landscape, hothouse and nature
Designer: Riz Reyes, RHR Horticulture (Seattle, WA)

Model: Alexander Brooks
Makeup: Yessie Libby, Yessie Makeup Artistry, Seattle
Photography: Mary Grace Long, Mary Grace Long Photography, Seattle
Location: Mary Grace Long Studio and Discovery Park, Seattle

Floral Palette: Bulb flowers, including iris, tulip, calla lily; Foliages, including ornamental cabbage, sword fern and wild huck
Designer: Tara Folker, Splints & Daisies, (Lancaster, PA)
Floral ingredients supplied by Stargazer Barn, Arcata, CA.

Model: Ashley Garner
Makeup: Stefani Burket, The Bonafide Ginger
Photography: Jillian and Ryan McGrath, With Love and Embers
Location: Hingework

Floral Palette: California-grown hybrid tea roses, garden roses and spray roses and their seasonal companions
Designer: Teresa Sabankaya, Bonny Doon Garden Co., (Santa Cruz, CA)
Floral ingredients supplied by California Pajarosa, Watsonville, CA, and Bonny Doon Garden Co., Santa Cruz, CA

Model: Antalia Sabankaya
Makeup: Zachary Winer
Hair: Carly Vollers
Photography: John Kaemmerling Photography
Location: Sabankaya family garden, Bonny Doon, CA

AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK PRESENTS . . . SLOW FLOWERS SUMMIT

Read more about the Slow Flowers Summit here.

Sign up to attend! Tickets still available for the July 2nd event in Seattle.

 

2017 American Flowers Week Graphics

Sunflower Gown, Stunning Model, Sublime Setting . . . what else could you ask for?

We’ve just uploaded 2017 American Flowers Week Graphics and collateral images that you can use on social media and for your own marketing projects. Click here to find them all.

Thanks to our amazing designer, Jenny Diaz, for her ongoing creativity! You can learn more about Jenny’s work here. Follow Jenny on Instagram.

Thanks to Amy Kunkel-Patterson of Gather Design Co. (Seattle) for taking on the design challenge of creating a high-fashion sunflower gown!

Thanks to our beautiful model, Kelly Uhlig of Sonshine Flower Farm, a flower farmer who knows how to go glam when she has to!

Thanks to our venue, Everyday Flowers, contributed by flower farmer Vivian Larsen.

Thanks to the farmers of the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market for donating hundreds and hundreds of beautiful, fresh and local sunflowers, rudbeckias, amaranthus and more!

Photography by the very talented Anna Peters and hair/makeup by the artistic Yessie Libby.

More graphics for your many social places:

Instagram Badge

Badge for your blog or web site

Post Card

 

A New Floral Holiday, American Flowers Week

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SLOWFLOWERS.COM ANNOUNCES 2017 AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK
A new Floral Holiday, now in its third year
Set for June 28-July 4, 2017
 

SEATTLE, WA (May 1, 2017) Slowflowers.com, the comprehensive online resource that connects consumers with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers, today announced details about the third annual “American Flowers Week.”

Since 2015, Slowflowers.com creator Debra Prinzing has staged a week-long celebration of domestic flowers to raise consumer awareness and unite America’s flower farmers with the U.S. floral industry. Last year, that effort generated more than 1.3 million social media impressions on Twitter and Instagram in a single month, demonstrating the power of images, ideas and values that promote American Grown Flowers.

Clearly, we’re experiencing a new normal marketplace in which consumers are highly conscious of the origins of the goods they purchase, and this is more evident in the floral industry than ever before,” Prinzing said. “The Slow Flowers community of growers and designers believe it’s important to raise awareness and celebrate local and domestic flowers with a new American floral holiday.

For the 2017 campaign, Slow Flowers has commissioned five Floral Style Fashion Shoots featuring iconic American-grown flowers, including sunflowers, roses, peonies and more. The wearable floral fashions designed by five Slowflowers.com member florists will be unveiled during American Flowers Week. Those designers include Amy Kunkel-Patterson of Gather Design Co., Riz Reyes of RHR Horticulture, Tara Folker of Splints & Daisies, Teresa Sabankaya of Bonny Doon Garden Co. and Arthur Williams, AIFD, of Babylon Floral. These American-grown floral looks feature flowers and foliages donated by the farmers of the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, Stargazer Barn, California Pajarosa and The Fresh Herb Co., among others.

Many of the floral fashions will be published in the June 2017 issue of Florists’ Review magazine and the full gallery of images will be revealed and shared during American Flowers Week, Prinzing said.

In addition, American Flowers Week will be celebrated during a one-day Slow Flowers Summit, a symposium for progressive thought and action in the floral industry. Called a “Ted Talk for Flower Lovers,” the Summit takes place on Sunday, July 2, 2017 at the Surf Incubator Event Space in Downtown Seattle.

Sponsorship support from green industry partners greatly enhances the impact of the campaign, Prinzing said. Those sponsors include Certified American Grown Flowers, Arctic Alaska Peony Growers, Syndicate Sales, Johnny’s Selected Seeds and Longfield Gardens.

“Certified American Grown is excited to be part of promoting a week focused on America’s flower farming families and the flowers they grow,” said Kasey Cronquist, administrator of Certified American Grown. “Origin matters, and we believe a week like this helps drive public awareness about the quality, beauty and economic benefits of supporting and buying homegrown blooms. Buying American Grown Flowers makes a difference.”

“Johnny’s Selected Seeds is thrilled to be an American Flowers Week partner,” said Gretchen Kruysman, Johnny’s marketing director. “We encourage our customers, employees and the flower farming and gardening community to plant more flowers and help local flowers thrive.”

“Syndicate Sales is an American manufacturer of vases and supplies for the professional florist, so it’s entirely fitting to promote the vibrant American-grown floral palette from local flower farms and floral designers who fill our vases,” says Kelvin Frye, Syndicate Sales’ director of sales and marketing. “We salute American Flowers Week.”

“At Longfield Gardens, we supply gardeners with the best quality plants and bulbs for their landscapes, cutting gardens and containers,” says Jen Pfau, marketing director for Longfield Gardens. “American Flowers Week helps us shine the light on the amazing selection of flowers to plant, cut and arrange. It’s a great campaign that involves everyone from home gardeners to flower farmers and florists.”

American Flowers Week is designed to engage the public, policymakers and the media in a conversation about the origins of their flowers. As an advocacy effort, the campaign coincides with America’s Independence Day on July 4th, providing florists, retailers, wholesalers and flower farmers a patriotic opportunity to promote American grown flowers.

American Flowers Week supporters can find more information and resources at americanflowersweek.com. Downloadable fact sheets, infographics and the 2017 American Flowers Week logo and social media badges are available for growers and florists to use for marketing and promotion efforts.

The “50 States of American Grown Flowers” contest will highlight local flowers from across the country, Prinzing said. “Slowflowers.com member farms and florists are invited to submit their designs to a gallery to be shared with media during American Flowers Week. Our goal is to showcase the botanical and seasonal beauty from flower farms and designers in all 50 states.”

Participants are encouraged to use the social media tag #Americanflowersweek to help spread the word about this campaign across all platforms.

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Four Seasons of Floral Design

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0117january2017frontcoverJanuary 2017 welcomed the arrival of a new, expanded and redesigned FLORISTS’ REVIEW Magazine and Slow Flowers is featured inside its covers in a big way.

Thanks to our relationships with many lifestyle publications like FLORISTS’ REVIEW, we are providing more creative content about American-grown flowers and the farms and florists who supply those blooms with audiences hungry for authenticity and inspiration!

We’re expecially excited about Debra Prinzing’s article entitled “Four Seasons of Floral Design,” which features the artistry of Kelly Shore of Petals by the Shore, and the flowers, foliages and plants grown by Leon and Carol Carrier of Plant Masters flower farm.

From left: Carol Carrier, Kelly Shore and Leon Carrier. The perfect collaboration between florist and flower farmers. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography

From left: Carol Carrier, Kelly Shore and Leon Carrier. The perfect collaboration between florist and flower farmers. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography

It was after learning more about the Slow Flowers movement that Kelly asked herself, “What would happen if I made a bouquet in every season on someone’s farm?”

Kelly and her team have generously shared a few photos with us here to inspire you as you plan for American Flowers Week 2017! Whether you’re a flower farmer or a floral designer, we encourage you to think about how you can team up to create some magic that conveys the best of American-grown flowers!

WINTER Wonderland

Kelly started the #ayearoflocalflowers social media hash-tag and you can find her on Instagram @ayearoflocalflowers

Kelly started the #ayearoflocalflowers social media hash-tag and you can find her on Instagram @ayearoflocalflowers © Audra Wrisley Photography for the winter series.

Floral crown, bouquet, centerpieces and other decor are made from Plant Masters' greenhouse and field products, including poinsettias and succulents.

Floral crown, bouquet, centerpieces and other decor are made from Plant Masters’ greenhouse and field products, including poinsettias and succulents.

Love the amaryllis + poinsettias + succulents + paperwhites + cedar + ilex for a stunning winter bouquet -- all local!

Love the amaryllis + poinsettias + succulents + paperwhites + cedar + ilex for a stunning winter bouquet — all local!

Authentic winter botanical beauty - from the farm.

Authentic winter botanical beauty – from the farm.

Florals – Petals by the Shore
Coordination – Rose Gold Events & Styling
Hair/makeup: Lori Nansi
Photography:  Audra Wrisley Photography
Ribbon/fabric: Silk & Willow
Dress: TLC bridal boutique
Earrings: The Jewel’s Nest
Model: Alexandra Penn

SPRING Awakening

Kelly's "spring story" focuses on a girl who is out in the flower fields picking every element of her wedding flowers -- and then designing them. © Joy Michelle Photography

Kelly’s “spring story” focuses on a girl who is out in the flower fields picking every element of her wedding flowers — and then designing them. © Joy Michelle Photography for the spring series.

A young bride gathers and arranges her garden-inspired wedding flowers from Plant Masters' fields and greenhouses.

A young bride gathers and arranges her garden-inspired wedding flowers from Plant Masters’ fields and greenhouses.

Kelly's intern, Rosalind Elles, is the "spring awakening" model

Kelly’s intern, Rosalind Elles, is the “spring awakening” model

Here, Rosalind designs with just-picked sweet peas, foxgloves, peonies and lilacs.

Here, Rosalind designs with just-picked sweet peas, foxgloves, peonies and lilacs.

Florals – Petals by the Shore
Coordination – Rose Gold Events & Styling
Hair/makeup: Something Blu Beauty
Photography: Joy Michelle Photography
Dress: Gossamer
Ribbon/fabric: Silk & Willow
Ring:  Boone and Sons
Model: Rosalind Elles

SUMMER Explosion

Kelly's summer story involves a real-life couple among a sea of Plant Masters' 'Limelight' panicle Hydrangeas. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography for summer series.

Kelly’s summer story involves a real-life couple among a sea of Plant Masters’ ‘Limelight’ panicle Hydrangeas. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography for the summer series.

The lovely bouquet explodes with zinnias, rudbeckia, dahlias, lilies, cosmos, tuberoses, ornamental grasses and much more.

The lovely bouquet explodes with zinnias, rudbeckia, dahlias, lilies, cosmos, tuberoses, ornamental grasses and much more.

Kelly asked a local vendor called Picnic Pos to bring artisan flavored ice pops as a charming summertime prop.

Kelly asked a local vendor called Picnic Pops to bring artisan flavored ice pops as a charming summertime feature.

Romance in the zinnia field at Plant Masters.

Romance in the zinnia field at Plant Masters.

Florals – Petals by the Shore
Coordination – Rose Gold Events & Styling
Hair/makeup: Lori Nansi
Photography:  Kirsten Smith Photography
Popsicles: Picnic Pops
Vintage rentals: Faccia Fresca Vintage
Dress: Gossamer
Ribbon/fabric: Silk & Willow
Ring: Trumpet & Horn
Models: Kyle & Jennifer Ertter

FALL Romance

Fall represents the height of harvest at Plant Masters farm. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography for the fall series.

Fall represents the height of harvest at Plant Masters farm. (c) Kirsten Smith Photography for the fall series.

The sweetheart table is embellished with seasonal vegetables, gourds and pumpkins, as well as local pies and local flowers in Kelly's gorgeous centerpiece.

The sweetheart table is embellished with seasonal vegetables, gourds and pumpkins, as well as local pies and local flowers in Kelly’s gorgeous centerpiece.

The high tunnels at Plant Masters reveal the floral agriculture that defines this beautiful Maryland flower farm.

The high tunnels at Plant Masters reveal the floral agriculture that defines this beautiful Maryland flower farm. Mexican sage, ornamental cabbages and marigolds thrive here, ready for harvest.

Fall-blooming celosia and late-season dahlias are the focal elements of the bridal bouquet.

Fall-blooming celosia and late-season dahlias are the focal elements of the bridal bouquet.

Florals – Petals by the Shore
Coordination – Rose Gold Events & Styling
Hair: Hypnotic Salon & Spa
Makeup: Makeup by Kevan
Photography: Kirsten Smith Photography
Invitation/paper goods: Natalie Drake Design
Pies: Butlers Orchard
Dress: Gossamer
Ribbon/fabric: Silk & Willow
Models: Edward & Britney Gourley

Please click here to download and read a PDF of the entire story: four-seasons-of-flowers, courtesy of Florists’ Review.

Click here to subscribe to Florists’ Review magazine.

Waving the Flower Flag

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Imagine: An 8-foot-tall by 12-foot-wide floral flag! All photos courtesy Certified American Grown.

Imagine: An 8-foot-tall by 12-foot-wide floral flag! All photos courtesy Certified American Grown.

Something pretty amazing took place a few months ago when the Wholesale Florist & Floral Supplier Association (also known as WFFSA) conference was held in Miami.

As attendees from around the world walked into the Miami Airport & Convention Center, they were greeted by an 8-by-12 foot “Stars and Stripes” flag fabricated out of approximately 10,000 stems of foliage and flowers.

Christy Hulsey, of Colonia House of Flowers, with her creation.

Christy Hulsey, of Colonia House of Flowers, with her creation, including red pine-cone ginger lilies from her grandmother’s garden in Georgia.

Designed by Slowflowers.com member Christy Hulsey of Colonial House of Flowers, the amazing, three-dimensional installation was impossible to ignore. “It stood proudly in the lobby of the conference registration area for all to see and it was a beautiful piece, enjoyed by many people who took their picture with it throughout the week,” says Kasey Cronquist, administrator of Certified American Grown Flowers, who envisioned the giant floral flag, invited Christy to produce it and recruited numerous flower farms to contribute thousands of flowers and foliage stems for its construction.

Details, Details, all 10,000 of them!

Details, Details, all 10,000 of them!

While this story has nothing specific to do with American Flowers Week, I want to share Christy’s story of passion, commitment to her family and community, and love of American flowers. This is a story of total sacrifice and it shouldn’t go unrecognized.

PLUS, I think you’ll draw inspiration as you plan your own over-the-top way to celebrate American Flowers Week 2017! You just might want to build your own FLORAL FLAG!

ALL AMERICAN INSPIRATION

There’s nothing more near and dear to me than American flowers,” Christy says. “It was such an honor to create this piece.

The larger-than-life botanical endeavor came together with ingenuity and sheer determination, the type of superhuman skills required of a designer like Christy who is used to executing large-scale weddings and events for her south Georgia-based floral business. “This project came together in less than four weeks. We had to build it on-site in a very short period of time.”

Keeping everything fresh and fantastic!

Keeping everything fresh and fantastic!

Christy credits fellow Chapel Designer Lisa Thorne of Thorne & Thistles in Auburn, Alabama, for helping her with the conceptual design. “Lisa created the original outline for the wall. She drew this! Out of the goodness of her heart. No compensation. No credit. She just did it! And she also created the flower recipe,” Christy says. “Without being asked, Lisa just took the ball and ran. She spent so many hours working on this project . . . and thank goodness.”
[Note: This help was so essential to Christy because at the time, her home town had been hit by a fall hurricane and she was without electricity and certainly didn’t have access to the Internet.]

Christy’s husband Brian Hulsey, who has extensive carpentry and electrical training, lent hours of his construction talents, as well as financial support for supplies. “It’s amazing that we were able to make this happen,” she says.

This side view gives a sense of the flag-wall's depth and dimension

This side view gives a sense of the flag-wall’s depth and dimension

The structure’s plywood base was constructed to look like a flag billowing in the wind. It was so large that once Brian finished, Christy had to rent a cargo van to transport it more than 500 miles to Miami. Erected on site, the base was stabilized with a pulley system attached to the back of the wall. Four buckets filled with 100-pound sandbags were hooked to the pulleys as counterweights.

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How to Throw a Farmer-Florist Party

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Farmers and Florists in Greenville, South Carolina, came together to celebrate local flowers for American Flowers Week 2016 (c) Angela Zion Photography

Farmers and Florists in Greenville, South Carolina, came together to celebrate local flowers for American Flowers Week 2016 (c) Angela Zion Photography

If you’re like me, planning for 2017 is top-of-mind these days. And it’s not too early to begin your American Flowers Week 2017 promotional prep!

Here’s some inspiration to get you started. I’ve been wanting to share the story of SC Upstate Flowers, a group of creative and motivated flower farmers who are staking a claim for Slow Flowers in their community. They planned a fun, festive, floral — and affordable — promotional event that was a huge success.

Meet Melissa Smith, Fraylick Farm (c) Angela Zion

Meet Melissa Smith, Fraylick Farm (c) Angela Zion

The goal? To use the occasion of American Flowers Week to introduce themselves and their beautiful, local blooms to their hometown florists.

Flower farmer and Slowflowers.com member Melissa Smith of Fraylick Farm knew that American Flowers Week 2016 (June 28-July 4) was coming up after reading about it in Slowflowers.com newsletters.

“I thought, ‘we need to do something with this — this is a good opportunity,'” she explained. The idea of a “Farmer-Florist Party” took on a life of its own when Suzie Bunn of Statice Floral offered to hold the party in her Greenville studio.

Gorgeous, natural light fills The Station, where florist Suzie Bunn and her business Statice Floral are based.

Gorgeous, natural light fills The Station, where florist Suzie Bunn and her business Statice Floral are based.

“The Station,” where Suzie’s design studio is housed, is actually an old gas station converted into a multi-artist commercial space. In addition to a printmaker, two photographers work here, including Angela Zion, who offered to capture the Farmer-Florist Party on film. She has generously shared some of those images with us here.

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American Flowers Week inspires one designer’s styled shoot

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Parie Design's all-American and local backyard farm-to-table dinner (c) Mallory Morgan Creative

Parie Design’s all-American and local backyard farm-to-table dinner (c) Mallory Morgan Creative

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Parie Donaldson, CEO of Parie Designs in Amarillo, Texas, learned about American Flowers Week from our social media posts and from her fellow Chapel Designer, Kansas City-based Andrea K. Grist of Andrea K. Grist Floral Design.

But rather than just posting a floral image on her Instagram feed, Parie and her team took American Flowers Week to new levels. They created a styled shoot, called “BACKYARD FARM TO TABLE DINNER PARTY,” and submitted the photos to a favorite style blog: Inspired by This.

As floral designers, this group of gals was excited to host a beautiful backyard farm to table dinner party. Not only did we find out about American Flowers Week, but also gathered such fresh and fun inspiration for parties of our own! It doesn’t get much better than farm fresh food and even fresher cut flowers. (The charcuterie board will make your mouth water!) Parie Designs put themselves in charge of planning (and styling) this soiree at a super cool venue – The Bowery Warehouse. They’re sharing their favorite parts with us here.

We were thrilled to have a small dinner party in honor of American Flowers Week just a few weeks ago! We get to spend so much time designing beautiful florals from Holland and other faraway places, which we love, but we jumped at the opportunity to cut some of our blooms from our own backyards and enjoy an evening together complete with yummy cocktails, delicious food and good company.

2upYou can see the entire story here.

I recently scheduled a phone date with Parie to learn about her charming American Flowers Week-styled shoot. Here’s an excerpt:

AFW: I’m curious about your “styled shoots”? Why do you invest time and resources to create them?

PD: We do four to six a year. I’m so lucky that we now have an amazing photographer on staff — Mallory Morgan Henderson. She’s our new floral designer, but she’s also a photographer. It seems like every shoot or wedding I’ve done with Mallory has been published. She’s smart, savvy and spectacular. Now we can say: “Let’s do a shoot,” and we can come up with the plan, thanks to Mallory.

gardenparty30of32AFW: What inspired the Backyard Farm to Table Dinner Party?

PD: I’ve been back in Amarillo for more than 20 years after living in and beginning my floral career in Seattle. In that time, I’ve literally only known of three farms that grow flowers. We’re surrounded here by farms where cattle, sourghum and corn are raised, but there’s nobody here growing flowers anymore. For some time, there was an amazing woman who had the most fabulous peonies growing on an acre or two — I would try to take every peony she had.

So instead, for this shoot, we sourced produce from the one local organic food farmer and then we cut everything out of my garden and our team member’s gardens (for the decor).

AFW: I love how casual and elegant you made things look. Very luxe and comfortable at the same time!

PD: Thanks! This became our employee photo shoot. We made the beautiful dinner ourselves, we imbibed, we ate, we enjoyed the evening, we took pictures.

AFW: How did you learn about American Flowers Week and decide to get involved?

PD: I knew about it because I’m a Chapel Designer. I’m watching everything go on — I’ve really been trying to get to one of those Field to Vase DInners, too.

AFW: Do you think you’ll ever grow your own flowers just to be able to design with more seasonal, local and American grown botanicals?

PD: You know, across from The Bowery, our event space, we own this huge lot. It’s mainly used for parking but I look at it every day and I find myself thinking: “How could I get water to it?” I’m sure there’s space to grow some flowers there.

AFW: Thank you, Parie! It has been great learning from you and I can’t wait to see what you come up with for American Flowers Week 2017!

Follow Parie Design on Facebook

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Seattle Wholesale Growers Market joins American Flowers Week

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wgm-sq-horiz3Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, the innovative farmer-to-florist wholesale cooperative based in Seattle, has stepped up its support for American Flowers Week 2017, today announcing its sponsorship of one of five Floral Style Fashion shoots.

SWGMC is excited about the opportunity to support and sponsor American Flowers Week. This creative campaign encourages consumers to think about where their cut flowers are grown, and brings about more awareness of the importance of our domestic flower farms, and the challenges they face.
— Molly Sadowsky, Market Manager

We’ve assembled a talented “dream team” behind the Prairie-inspired floral look, which will be depicted in a pastoral setting that reflects American floral agriculture at its best!

Inspiration board featuring NW-grown flowers from Jello Mold Farm, Everyday Flowers, Sonshine Farm and Rain Drop Farm.

Inspiration board featuring NW-grown flowers from Jello Mold Farm, Everyday Flowers, Sonshine Farm and Rain Drop Farm.

Let me introduce you to the team:

FLOWERS, FOLIAGE AND BOTANICALS: Supplied by the flower farms of Seattle Wholesale Growers Market

SLOW FLOWERS DESIGNER: Amy Kunkel-Patterson of Gather Design Co. (Seattle)

OUR MODEL: Flower farmer Kelly Uhlig of Sonshine Farm (Whidbey Island, WA)

HAIR & MAKEUP: Yessie Libby of Yessie Makeup Artistry (Seattle)

PHOTOGRAPHY: Anna Peters of Anna Peters Photogaphy (Seattle)

LOCATION: Everyday Flowers owned by Vivian Larson (Stanwood, WA)

We can’t wait to share this imagery with you! But it will be embargoed until American Flowers Week 2017 — June 28-July 4, 2017.

Get in touch if you’d like to learn more about our Floral Style Fashions — we’re producing 5 in all so there’s still time to become a sponsor! I’m at debra (at) slowflowers (dot) com (debra@slowflowers.com).

Australian Flowers Week announced for September 17-25

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This just in from the U.K. blog Flowerona:

floweronalogoAustralian Flowers WeekAUSTRALIAN FLOWER WEEK
After the wonderful successes of British Flowers Week and American Flowers Week, the inaugural Australian Flowers Week will be taking place this month from September 17th-25th. It’s designed to celebrate the beauty of Australian flowers and foliage. For more details, simply visit the Australian Flowers Week website.

Congratulations from AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK to everyone in Australia who is working to sustain and promote domestic, Australia-grown flowers and floral design that supports the ethos of local and seasonal botanicals!

P.S. subscribe to the FLOWERONA newsletter here.

Flowerstock joins American Flowers Week

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Floral designer and educator Holly Heider Chapple, creator of the Chapel Designers, has something big in store for her first FLOWERSTOCK, which takes place October 17-18 at Hope Flower Farm.

“(I’m) excited to announce that Slow Flowers will be an official sponsor for Flowerstock,” Holly shared on her Instagram feed (@hollychapple). “During the festival we will be creating a top secret floral design on their behalf. This design will be created with all American-grown flowers!”

This is indeed exciting news! The participants of Flowerstock will create one of our five American Flowers Week “Floral Style” fashion shoots featuring an iconic American-grown flower to reflect the robust domestic flower farming community and the spirit of local and seasonal floristry.

In joining forces with American Flowers Week, Flowerstock will be named a Floral Style Sponsor. Images of the Flowerstock Floral Style creation will be included in the 2017 American Flowers Week promotions to media, industry and consumers.

About Flowerstock: Flowerstock is being offered at the rate of $825 and includes demonstrations and installations from Ariella Chezar, Robbie Honey, Naomi De Manana, Holly Chapple, Lisa Waud, Sweetroot Village, Oak and the Owl, Fleur Inc, Southern Blooms and Joseph Massie. This is a festival vibe with live music, glamping tents, food trucks, bonfires, and sundries! Details and tickets can be found here.